LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO

2024-2025 CATALOG

The Academic Catalog is the official listing of courses, programs of study, academic policies and degree requirements for Loyola University Chicago. It is published every year in advance of the next academic year.

Undergraduate

Students are personally responsible to review the following general academic rules and regulations. If students have questions about particular regulations, they should contact their academic dean's office for clarification.

Academic Appeals

The University’s commitment to the care of the individual person is the foundation for an appeals process that affords students the opportunity to have a review of circumstances that impact their academic standing or progress at the University.

Student Rights in an Academic Appeal Process When a Hearing Will Take Place

All students have the right to be treated with dignity and respect throughout any interaction with the academic appeal process and have the following procedural rights during hearings:

  1. Right to Participate: To be present throughout the hearing but not during the deliberation process of the hearing board
  2. Right to an Advisor: To be accompanied by an advisor, if desired (see section on rights of an advisor)
  3. Right to Review: To review all documentation concerning the potential policy violations during the hearing
  4. Right to Refute: To refute information provided by witnesses

Appeal for a Change in Academic Record

A student’s appeal to change an academic record (e.g., withdrawal date) must be submitted using the Appeal for Change of Academic Record form to describe mitigating circumstances as to why the academic record should be changed. An appeal to change an academic record must be submitted within one calendar year after the last day of the academic term in question. Appeals for summer terms must be received by June 1 of the following academic year. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.

Appeal of Final Grade

Students who wish to contest a final course grade may initiate the academic appeal process. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.

Appeal a Finding of Academic Misconduct

Students who wish to contest a finding of academic misconduct may review the academic integrity policy. If a student wishes to appeal a finding of Academic Misconduct they should submit the Academic Appeal Form. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.

Appeal for a Decision Related to Transfer Credit

Students requesting review of their transfer credit decision communicated by the Office of Registration and Records, may do so by submitting a formal written letter of appeal to the Office of Registration and Records, Associate Registrar at transfer-credit@luc.edu. This appeal is the student’s opportunity to explain reasons why the transfer credit should be reconsidered. A syllabus must be provided to support the student’s position. No appeal will be considered until all final, official transcripts are received by the Office of Registration and Records.

Students will be notified via Loyola email of the outcome of their appeal of transfer credit articulation decision by the Office of Registration and Records within 10 business days. All appeal decisions made by the Office of Registration and Records are final.

Appeal of Dismissal for Poor Scholarship

Students dismissed due to poor scholarship may appeal their dismissal by submitting the Appeal of Dismissal for Poor Scholarship form to their academic Dean’s Office. Students enrolled in more than one school may only submit one appeal to the Dean’s office of their choosing from which they were dismissed. This form is the student’s opportunity to explain any mitigating circumstances as to why the student’s dismissal should be reconsidered. Documentation must be provided to support the student’s position. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.

A dismissal will be overturned only when a student is able to produce specific documentation that proves University error or extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control that warrant an exception to University academic policies.

The appeal must be made within 10 business days of the date of email notification of academic dismissal. The academic Dean’s office may determine that a student meeting is required after the appeal is submitted. Appeal decisions will be made within 10 business days of the receipt of the appeal.

A student may request an appeal decision made by an Assistant or Associate Dean to be considered by the Dean. Appeal decisions made by the Dean are final.

Academic Appeal Process

Purpose of the Academic Appeal Process

With very rare exceptions, the final decision on all grades rests with the professor. Students have the right to protection, through fair procedures, against arbitrary and capricious academic evaluations. Arbitrary and capricious means that there is no relation between the grade given and the student's performance in the class and that a reasonable person could not find that the grade was deserved. Mere disagreement or dissatisfaction with a grade thus does not constitute a basis for an appeal.

In order to provide a forum for the fair resolution of academic disputes involving individual student complaints of the appropriateness of course grades and accusations of academic misconduct the following processes have been developed and will be applied to all cases involving Loyola undergraduate students.

ACADEMIC APPEAL PROCESS: COURSE GRADE DISPUTE

  1. The student's first step in the event of a grade dispute is to confer directly with the instructor.
  2. If the grade dispute is not resolved, a student must submit a formal request using the Academic Appeal Form: Course Grade Dispute for a grade change no later than 30 days into the following semester explaining in detail why the grade is arbitrary and capricious. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.
    1. If the final grade is assigned in spring or summer semester, the student must submit the appeal no later than 30 days into the fall semester.
    2. If the final grade is assigned in fall or J-term, the student must submit the appeal no later than 30 days into the spring semester.
    3. For a course offered by the School of Continuing and Professional Studies, the student must submit the appeal no later than 30 days after the final grade is officially posted.
  3. The Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee determines whether or not there are grounds for an appeal.
    1. When the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee determines there are no grounds for an appeal, the student will be notified via Loyola email that a hearing board will not be convened.
      1. If the student disagrees with the determination by the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee, the student may appeal to the appropriate academic Dean. In cases where the student is enrolled in a school other than the one in which the course is taught, the academic Deans of the two schools will review the appeal together. The student's academic Dean’s office will notify the student of the final decision via Loyola email.
    2. When the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee determines there are grounds for an appeal, the student will be notified via Loyola email that a hearing board will be convened.
    3. It is up to the discretion of the Dean or his/her designee if a student may continue taking courses in a sequence where the course grade under review is a pre-requisite.
  4. Each department will have a standing hearing board or have the means to constitute a hearing board for each dispute. Board members are chosen by the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee and will consist of three to five faculty members other than the faculty member involved or Department Chair. In smaller departments or interdisciplinary programs, board members may be members of different departments.
  5. The chairperson of each hearing board will be selected by the person who appoints the hearing board. The chairperson of the hearing board receives all requests for hearings from the department, sets the calendar, notifies all involved parties of the dates and times of hearings via Loyola email, and informs students by written notice of the decisions of the board.
  6. The hearing will be held within 10 business days of the receipt of the request for a hearing, if practicable.
  7. The hearing will be private.
  8. Hearings for a grade dispute generally proceed according to the following format:
    1. Introduction of all parties present (including witnesses, when applicable) and an overview of the hearing process.
    2. Review of the Student Rights in the Academic Appeal Process form.
    3. Students should complete the electronic form in advance of the hearing.
    4. Hearing board chairperson reviews the nature of the grade dispute and the University policy potentially violated.
    5. Witnesses are excused until statements are needed (if applicable).
    6. Student(s) (and Instructor(s) when applicable) provide a personal account of the reported incident.
    7. Student(s) (and Instructor(s) when applicable) have the opportunity to review all documentation relevant to the case that will be used by the hearing board to make a decision.
    8. Hearing board members ask any remaining investigative questions to the parties present (including witnesses, if applicable).
    9. Student(s) are provided a final opportunity to make any closing comments.
    10. Instructor(s) are provided a final opportunity to make any closing comments.
    11. Hearing board chair may excuse all parties for deliberation if needed
    12. Student(s) (and Instructor(s) when applicable) are notified of the decision and any related outcomes either immediately after deliberation or, when further deliberation is needed, typically within 5 business days in writing via Loyola email.
  9. Both the student and the faculty member involved may be accompanied by one advisor of their choice throughout the hearing process. The individual must inform the chairperson of the hearing board via Loyola email of the name of the advisor at least 2 business days before the hearing date.
    1. The role of an advisor is to provide a comforting presence for the student and/or instructor. An advisor may only speak to the advisee. An advisor may not ask questions, interject, advocate for, or otherwise speak on behalf of the advisee. Even if an advisor is an attorney, the advisor may not function as legal counsel or “represent” an advisee during the hearing process.
    2. If any advisor conducts themselves in a manner inconsistent with these guidelines, or if the advisor’s behavior obstructs or interferes with the hearing process, the advisor will be warned by the board.
    3. If the advisor’s interfering behavior continues or if the advisor engages in a manner that harasses, abuses, or intimidates any other participant, the advisor will be excused from the hearing immediately.
  10. The student and/or instructor have the option of submitting relevant materials to the hearing board prior to or at the time of the hearing. Individuals in the hearing process have the responsibility of presenting truthful information.
  11. The Board may address questions to any party.
  12. The chairperson of the hearing board determines the hearing processes (e.g. location, order of proceedings, determining what evidence is relevant, determining if additional information is needed, etc.). The standard of evidence required for a board to determine that arbitrary and capricious academic evaluation occurred is known as a “preponderance of the evidence.” This means the board must determine that it is more likely than not that arbitrary and capricious academic evaluation occurred based on the totality of available evidence.
  13. All decisions of the board must be determined by a majority vote of the hearing board members. A final decision must be rendered by the board by the end of the hearing process.
  14. The student and instructor will be informed in writing via Loyola email by the chairperson of the board's decision within 5 business days of the hearing. The decision is also shared with the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee.
    1. If the hearing board determines that a grade change is not warranted, the chair of the hearing board will notify the student and the instructor involved of the decision.
    2. If the hearing board determines that a grade change is warranted, the Dean and/or Dean’s designee submits a grade change request to the Office of Registration and Records. The Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee will notify the student and the instructor involved of the decision vial Loyola email.

Should the student or instructor wish to contest the hearing board’s decision, an appeal letter to the Dean and/or Dean’s designee within 30 days of notice of the hearing board’s decision may be sent using the Academic Hearing Board Appeal form. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.

  1. The appeal letter must clearly identify the grounds for the appeal with appropriate supporting documentation. Mere disagreement or dissatisfaction with the decision does not constitute a basis for an appeal.
  2. The grounds to appeal the board’s decision must include one or more of the following criteria:
    1. New substantive information is available that was not reasonably available at the time of the hearing and could substantially impact the original findings or outcomes of the case.
    2. A substantive procedural error or error in the interpretation of University policy occurred that denied the student or instructor the right to a fair hearing and decision.
    3. The decision (findings or outcomes) is significantly incongruent with the established facts presented at the hearing or the established Undergraduate Academic Catalog.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity in an open, honest, and responsible manner. Academic integrity is a guiding principle for all academic activity at Loyola University Chicago, and all members of the University community are expected to act in accordance with this principle.

Standards

Failing to meet the following standards is a serious violation of personal honesty and the academic ideals that bind the University into a learning community. These standards apply to both individual and group assignments. Individuals working in a group may be held responsible if one of the group members has violated one or more of these standards.

  1. Students may not plagiarize.
    Plagiarism involves taking and using specific words, phrases, or ideas of others without proper acknowledgement of the sources. Students may not:
    1. Submit material copied from a published or unpublished source.
    2. Submit material that is not cited appropriately.
    3. Use another person's unpublished work or examination material.
    4. Allow or pay another party to prepare or write an assignment.
    5. Purchase, acquire, or use a pre-written assignment for credit.
    6. Use generative artificial intelligence to complete or write assignments or exams, partially or fully, without prior permission of the instructor.
  2. Students may not submit the same work for credit for more than one assignment (known as self-plagiarism).
    If a student plans to submit work with similar or overlapping content two or more times for any purpose, the student should consult with all instructors prior to submission of the work to make certain that such submission will not violate this standard.
  3. Students may not fabricate data.
    All experimental data, observations, interviews, statistical surveys, and other information collected and reported as part of academic work must be authentic. Any alteration, e.g., the removal of statistical outliers, must be clearly documented. Data must not be falsified in any way.
  4. Students may not collude.
    1. Students may not work with others on any exam, assignment or portion of an assignment without permission from the instructor.
    2. Students’ work with one another on an exam or assignments may not exceed the terms of their instructors’ directions for collaboration as part of the assignment.
    3. Students may not use work submitted by another student in a previous semester of a course.
  5. Students may not cheat.
    1. Students may not obtain, distribute, or communicate examination materials prior to the scheduled examination without the consent of the instructor.
    2. Students may not take an examination by proxy.
    3. Students may not attempt to change answers after an examination or an assignment has been submitted.
    4. Students may not falsify medical or other documents for any reason.
    5. Students may not use unauthorized study aids in an exam. Examples include, but are not limited to:
      1. Bringing notes into an exam that does not allow outside materials.
      2. Programming equations into a calculator when the instructor has indicated that students are to be tested on the recall of those same equations.
      3. Using any electronic device that allows students to look up, translate, calculate, or communicate information with someone else.
    6. Students may not facilitate academic misconduct.
      1. For example, a student may not allow another student to copy from their exam or give their own work to another student.

Sanctions

An instructor is responsible for determining the sanctions for academic misconduct in the course sections they teach. This also applies to individuals responsible for administering placement tests. Sanctions are assigned on a case-by-case basis while considering precedent and the following standards below. Academic deans may add to or elevate the initial sanctions assigned by the instructor based on the student's prior academic misconduct history:

  • the context and seriousness of the violation
  • the student's demonstrated commitment not to engage in the same behavior in the future; and
  • sanctions that appropriately foster accountability for one's behavior and prevent recurrence of similar behaviors

Below is a list of commonly assigned sanctions and instructors may choose from this entire list:

  1. Educational Experiences
    Educational experiences provide space for students to reflect upon their conduct; to identify how their action harmed themselves, others, and the community; and/or to explore why such conduct is unacceptable.

    Educational experiences or projects may include:
    1. Attendance and participation at a required meeting, workshop, special project, or other initiative.
    2. Completing an online tutorial focused on academic integrity.
    3. A written reflection about a specific topic or issue.
    4. Resubmission of the assignment or exam for partial credit.
    5. A required meeting with the appropriate dean to discuss the misconduct and the consequences.
    6. Completing restorative service hours and/or a Values Workshop.

      Deadlines for educational experiences may vary.
  2. Failing Grade on the assignment
    A letter grade of F or zero points will be issued for the assignment or examination.
  3. Failing Grade in a course
    A letter grade of F will be issued for the course.
  4. If a Placement Assessment violation, a warning may be issued.
    A Placement Assessment Warning is an official notice to the student that the student's behavior on their placement assessment was inappropriate and violated the Undergraduate Studies Catalog.
  5. University Suspension - may only be determined by the student's academic dean's office.
    University suspension involves the temporary removal of the student from the University for a specified period of time with the understanding the student may be allowed to return to the University at the completion of the suspension period after having satisfied any accompanying conditions. The Academic Dean’s office may consider suspension as an elevated sanction.

    Suspension from the University further entails being withdrawn from all enrolled courses (resulting in “W” grades) restriction from visiting the University premises except when engaged in official business approved by the Office of the Provost. Visiting the University premises without gaining approval may result in arrest. Students suspended from the University remain responsible for tuition and fees. Students suspended from the University also must forfeit their Loyola ID (Campus Card) and turn it in to Campus Safety. University suspension may also include any other disciplinary action that is judged to be of value to the student.

    Persons notified of a student’s suspension may include parent/guardian, The Office of the Provost, the Office of Registration and Records, the Bursar, the Office of the Dean of Students and their designees, Campus Safety, or other appropriate personnel at the discretion of the Office of the Provost. Suspended students may not study abroad or travel with the University and may not be approved to study abroad until 90 days after their suspension period has ended. University suspension is typically assigned for a minimum of the rest of the semester and may last any number of years.

    When a suspension is over and the student has completed any conditions accompanying the suspension, the student must contact their academic dean’s office requesting reinstatement and providing documentation demonstrating that the student has satisfied the terms of the suspension (if applicable). The academic dean’s office may require a meeting with the student before permitting reenrollment. The student may reenroll at the University only after the academic dean’s office has made an affirmative decision, notified the student, and released the registration hold on the student’s University account. If the suspension is for a period of one fall or spring semester, the student will return under the same catalog requirements that were in place for their declared majors/minors at the time of suspension. If the suspension is for a period longer than one fall or spring semester, the student will need to reapply to the university through the appropriate admission’s office.
  6. University Expulsion
    An academic dean may recommend a sanction of University Expulsion to the Provost. Expulsion from the University (also commonly known as dismissal) is the most serious University disciplinary action and means the permanent exclusion of the student from the University. Only the Provost may impose the sanction of expulsion as recommended by a Dean. The Provost’s decision is final. A student is not eligible to reapply or be readmitted to any other programs at Loyola University Chicago following expulsion.

    Expulsion may include: forfeiture of all rights and degrees not actually conferred at the time of the expulsion; permanent notation of the expulsion on the student’s academic record; withdrawal from all courses (resulting in “W” grades). Students expelled from the University remain responsible for tuition and fees. Students expelled from the University also must forfeit their Loyola ID (Campus Card) and turn it in to Campus Safety. Any student expelled from the University are not permitted to visit the University premises except when engaged in official business approved in advance and in writing by the Office of the Provost or Campus Safety. Visiting the University premises without gaining approval in advance may result in arrest.

    Persons notified of a student’s expulsion may include parent/guardian, the Office of the Dean of Students and their designees, the Office of Registration and Records, the Bursar, Campus Safety, or other appropriate personnel at the discretion of the Office of the Provost.

PROCESS

  1. Instructors will gather the appropriate information and documentation when they suspect an instance of academic misconduct has occurred. The standard of evidence required for an instructor to determine responsibility is known as a “preponderance of the evidence.” This means the instructor must determine that it is more likely than not that an alleged violation occurred based on the totality of available evidence.
  2. If instructors conclude an instance of academic misconduct has occurred, then they will determine the sanction as it relates to the course.
  3. Instructors will notify the student of their findings and sanction. Instructors should allow the student an opportunity to respond before reporting the incident.
  4. If after talking with the student or the student fails to respond to the instructor's outreach within two business days and instructors have determined that academic misconduct has occurred, instructors will then report the instance of academic misconduct, including supporting documentation, to the Department Chair and the student's academic Dean’s office.
  5. The case is reported through the Academic Misconduct Report form. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.
  6. The student's academic Dean’s office will notify the student that the instance of academic misconduct has been reported.
    1. The initial sanction determined by the instructor may be reviewed by the academic Dean’s office.
    2. The final sanction will be included in the notification.
  7. Incident reports and supporting materials regarding the academic misconduct are part of the student’s academic record. The academic record is not a transcript; this academic record is maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students for a period of seven years from the date of the incident with the exception of cases resulting in University Expulsion (such files are retained indefinitely).

Appeals

  1. Students retain the right to appeal the determination made at any stage of the process outlined above using the Academic Appeal Process described below.
  2. The decision of the academic Dean’s office is final in all cases except expulsion.

Academic Appeal Process:  Academic Misconduct

  1. If a student chooses to contest a finding of academic misconduct, the student's first step is to confer directly with the instructor.
  2. If a student and instructor are unable to resolve the issue relating to academic misconduct and the student still chooses to contest the finding, the student may appeal by submitting the Academic Appeal Form: Finding of Academic Misconduct no later than 30 days into the following semester.
    1. If the dispute occurs within a class in the spring or summer semester, the student must submit the appeal no later than 30 days into the fall semester.
    2. If the dispute occurs within a class in the fall or J-term, the student must submit the appeal no later than 30 days into the spring semester.
    3. For a course offered by the School of Continuing and Professional Studies, the student must submit the appeal no later than 30 days after the final grade is officially posted.
  3. The Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee determines whether or not there are grounds for an appeal.
    1. When the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee determines there are no grounds for an appeal, the student will be notified that a hearing board will not be convened.
    2. If the student disagrees with the determination by the Department Chair and/or Dean's designee, the student may appeal to the appropriate academic Dean. In cases where the student is enrolled in a school other than the one in which the course is taught, the academic Deans of the two schools will review the appeal together.
  4. The academic Dean's office will notify the student of the final decision.
  5. When the Department Chair and/or Dean's designee determine there are grounds for appeal, the student will be notified via Loyola email that a heading board will be convened.
  6. Each department will have a standing hearing board or have the means to constitute a hearing board for each dispute. Board members are chosen by the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee and will consist of three to five faculty members other than the faculty member involved or Department Chair. In smaller departments or interdisciplinary programs, board members may be members of different departments.
  7. The chairperson of each hearing board will be selected by the person who appoints the hearing board. The chairperson of the hearing board receives all requests for hearings from the department, sets the calendar, notifies all involved parties of the dates and times of the hearing and informs students by written notice of the decisions of the hearing board.
  8. The hearing will be held within two weeks of the receipt of the request for a hearing, if practicable.
  9. The hearing will be private and all information will be held confidential.
  10. Hearings for refuting a charge of academic misconduct generally proceed according to the following format:
    1. Introduction of all parties present (including witnesses, when applicable) and an overview of the hearing process.
    2. Review the Student Rights in the Academic Appeal Process form.
    3. Students should complete the electronic form in advance of the hearing.
    4. Hearing board chairperson reviews the nature of the alleged conduct and the University policies potentially violated.
    5. Witnesses are excused until statements are needed (if applicable).
    6. Student(s) (and Instructor(s) when applicable) provide a personal account of the reported incident.
    7. Student(s) (and Instructor(s) when applicable) have the opportunity to review all documentation relevant to the case that will be used by the hearing board to make a decision.
    8. Hearing board members ask any remaining investigative questions to the parties present (including witnesses, if applicable).
    9. Student(s) are provided a final opportunity to make any closing comments.
    10. Instructor(s) are provided a final opportunity to make any closing comments.
    11. Hearing board chair may excuse all parties for deliberation if needed.
    12. Student(s) (and Instructor(s) when applicable) are notified of the decision and any related outcomes either immediately after deliberation or, when further deliberation is needed, typically within five business days in writing, via Loyola email.
  11. Both the student and the faculty member involved may be accompanied by one advisor of their choice throughout the hearing process. The individual must inform the chairperson of the hearing board of the name of the advisor before the hearing date.
    1. The role of an advisor is to provide a comforting presence for the student and/or instructor. An advisor may only speak to the advisee. An advisor may not ask questions, interject, advocate for, or otherwise speak on behalf of the advisee. Even if an advisor is an attorney, the advisor may not function as legal counsel or “represent” an advisee during the hearing process.
    2. If any advisor conducts themselves in a manner inconsistent with these guidelines, or if the advisor’s behavior obstructs or interferes with the hearing process, the advisor will be warned by the board.
    3. If the advisor’s interfering behavior continues or if the advisor engages in a manner that harasses, abuses, or intimidates any other participant, the advisor will be excused from the hearing immediately.
  12. The student and/or instructor have the option of submitting relevant materials to the hearing board prior to or at the time of the hearing. Individuals in the hearing process have the responsibility of presenting truthful information.
  13. The board may address questions to any party.
  14. The chairperson of the hearing board determines the hearing processes (e.g. location, order of proceedings, determining what evidence is relevant, determining if additional information is needed, etc.). The standard of evidence required for a board to determine responsibility is known as a “preponderance of the evidence.” This means the board must determine that it is more likely than not that an alleged violation occurred based on the totality of available evidence.
  15. All decisions of the board must be determined by a majority vote of the hearing board members. A final decision must be rendered by the board by the end of the hearing process. All deliberations among the hearing board members are private.
  16. The student and instructor will be informed in writing via Loyola email by the chairperson of the board's decision within 10 business days of the hearing. The decision is also shared with the Department Chair and/or Dean’s designee.

    Should the student or the instructor wish to contest the hearing board’s decision, an appeal to the Dean and/or Dean’s designee within 30 days of notice of the hearing board’s decision may be sent using the Academic Hearing Board Appeal form. This form is the only approved process to submit such a request.
    1. The appeal letter must clearly identify the grounds for the appeal with appropriate supporting documentation. Mere disagreement or dissatisfaction with the decision does not constitute a basis for an appeal.
    2. The grounds to appeal the board’s decision must include one or more of the following criteria:
      1. New substantive information is available that was not reasonably available at the time of the hearing and could substantially impact the original findings or outcomes of the case.
      2. A substantive procedural error or error in the interpretation of University policy occurred that denied the student or instructor the right to a fair hearing and decision.
      3. The decision (findings or outcomes) is significantly incongruent with the established facts presented at the hearing or the established Undergraduate Academic Catalog.
  17. Upon receipt of the appeal letter, the Dean and/or the Dean’s designee will review the appeal to determine whether or not to uphold the decision of the hearing board.

    The student and the instructor will be notified via Loyola email by the Dean’s office of the final decision. This Dean and/or the Dean’s designee decision is final and binding.

Academic Standing

Loyola University Chicago understands education to be a process of academic development and growth; therefore academic progress is an important element in an individual's life at the university. The university has instituted formal procedures for warning and ultimately dismissing those who are not progressing as required. Academic probationary status and even academic dismissal should be understood as necessary, although unfortunate, consequences for those students directly involved. During the period of academic probation no student will be allowed to represent the university publicly. Any exception to this restriction must come explicitly from the student's academic dean. The student's academic dean determines when a student is placed on academic probation or dismissed for academic reasons.

Generally, academic standing is determined using a basic grade point average (GPA) criteria. Students must maintain a grade point average of at least 2.00 to be in good academic standing. Graduation from the university requires at least a 2.00 average for all coursework attempted and a minimum of a least a 2.00 average in a student's major.

Note - some majors have additional GPA requirements. Students must check with their major department to learn of the minimum grade point guidelines.

Probation

There are 2 types of academic probation: Academic Standing and Progress Toward a Degree.

Any student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 and who has a Quality Point Deficit of between 1 and 14 points will be placed on probation. Quality Point Deficit refers to the number of Quality Points below a 2.00 GPA on a student's record. For example, a student who has completed 34 semester hours with a 2.00 GPA has 68 Quality Points. A Quality Point Deficit refers to the number of quality points below 68. This formula is the same for any number of semester hours completed. The minimum Quality Point Standard is 2.0 times the number of attempted hours.

Students may also be placed on probation for not making progress toward degree completion. Any student whose cumulative GPA is 2.00 or better but who fails to show timely progression toward completion of his/her degree requirements may, at the discretion of his/her dean, be placed on probation. In such cases, the dean may require a contract defining the terms under which the student can remove him/herself from probation.

Continued on Probation

Any student who achieves a term GPA of at least 2.33 (C+) during the probationary semester, while not yet achieving a cumulative GPA of 2.00, will be continued on probation. For the purpose of calculating the grade point average (GPA), averages are NOT rounded, i.e., 3.49 is not rounded to 3.50.

Multiple Probations

Any student who is placed on probationary status more than one time will be allowed only one semester in which to return to good standing. If the student does not return to good standing at the end of that probationary semester, he/she may be dismissed for poor scholarship.

Dismissal for Poor Scholarship

Any student who has a quality point deficit of 15 or more points, even if he/she has not had a previous semester of probationary status, may be dismissed for poor scholarship. Any student who fails to achieve a term GPA of at least 2.33 (C+) for the probationary semester (unless he/she restores his/her cumulative GPA to a minimum of 2.00 at the end of that semester) will be dismissed for poor scholarship. For the purpose of calculating the grade point average (GPA), averages are NOT rounded, i.e., 3.49 is not rounded to 3.50.

Class Status and Academic Advising

Class Status and Academic Advising

First-year and sophomore students are advised in the Office of First and Second Year Advising; junior and senior students are advised in the Dean's Office of their school or college. In their first academic year at Loyola and in all subsequent years, transfer students (students who enter Loyola with 20 or more credits earned in a college or university setting) and students in the School of Professional Studies receive advising in the Dean's Office of their school or college.

For advising purposes first-year students are defined as those students who enter Loyola with fewer than 20 credits hours earned in a college or university setting. Sophomores have at least 30 earned credit hours, including credit earned at other colleges or universities; juniors at least 60 credit hours; and seniors at least 90 credit hours earned. Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate credits are not counted in the determination of class standing for advising purposes.

Students with Disabilities

At times, students with disabilities may wish to avail themselves of the University's ancillary services. Students who would like accommodations at the University need to contact the Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities. Contact information is available at www.luc.edu/sswd.

Computation of Academic Grade Point Averages

The academic grade point average (GPA) at the end of a term is determined by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of attempted graded credit hours carried in the term. Quality points are the result of multiplying credit points by credit hours. Courses taken under the Pass - No Pass Option are not counted in computing academic averages. For example, consider a student taking 15 credit hours for a semester:

Course Credit Hours Grade Credit Points Quality Points
UCWR 110 3 hrs C+ 2.33 6.99
ENGL 273 3 hrs B- 2.67 8.01
MATH 100 3 hrs P 0.00 0.00
PLSC 101 3 hrs B+ 3.33 9.99
HIST 103 3 hrs B 3.00 9.00

This student has 12 graded hours. The total Quality Points are 33.99. To compute the semester average, quality points are divided by total attempted graded hours. The average here is 2.83. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by adding each semester's quality points and dividing by the total number of attempted graded credit hours.

Courses with the grade of "I" are not counted in the total credit hours until they have been replaced by a permanent final grade. If the grade of "I" is not replaced with a permanent final grade within six weeks of the following semester, the "I" will be replaced automatically at the end of that period with a grade of "F" and this grade will be computed into the academic average.

No grades earned by a student for courses taken at a college other than Loyola or at a program or college not formally affiliated with Loyola shall be computed into Loyola's term or cumulative grade point averages. Transfer credit will count toward the number of hours required for graduation from Loyola, but will not be reflected on grade reports under cumulative average.

Credit by Examination

Loyola University Chicago subscribes to three plans whereby undergraduate students may obtain credit and/or advanced placement for college-level studies completed by examination:

  • Advanced Placement Program (AP),
  • College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and
  • International Baccalaureate (IB).

All AP and IB examinations must be completed before a student matriculates to the University. Official test scores must be submitted via the Undergraduate Admission Office and verified by the Office of Registration and Records within 30 days of matriculation. Transfer Credit Policy for New (First Time) Freshmen

Students may take CLEP examinations after they have matriculated, but only if they:

  • are not within 30 credit hours of graduation;
  • have not previously completed, failed, or received credit from Loyola University Chicago (transfer or otherwise) in a comparable or more advanced course in the specific examination area;
  • will not receive comparable credit in the CLEP examination area in the same term the examination is taken or in a subsequent term.

All official CLEP examination scores must be provided to the Office of Registration and Records at least one semester prior to anticipated graduation.

Credit Hour Limitation

Students may not carry more than 18 credit hours in one semester without approval of their dean.

First-year students and sophomores ordinarily are not given permission to carry excess hours.

Students on academic probation may be required to reduce their number of semester hours.

Students with outside employment are urged to carry reduced programs of study so as to ensure sufficient time for the academic preparation needed in obtaining their education.

Students who carry excess credit hours without the requisite permission may be denied the application of these credits toward their degree.

Earning Two Majors or Two Baccalaureate Degrees

Double Majors

Students may complete two Bachelor of Arts degrees or two Bachelor of Science degrees within 120 hours. To do this, students must complete the Core requirements and the requirements of both academic majors.

Completing Two (2) Baccalaureate Degrees

Students may complete 2 Baccalaureate degrees within 120 hours. To do this, students must complete the Core requirements and the requirements of both baccalaureate degree programs.

Students who complete the requirements for a major leading to a Bachelor of Arts and a major leading to a Bachelor of Science in the College of Arts and Sciences will be awarded both a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science.

Students can complete 2 Baccalaureate degrees granted by different Colleges and Schools within 120 hours. This includes but is not limited to: BS/BSW; BS/BBA; BS/BBA; BA or BS/B.Ed; BSW/BBA; BA/BSN

Students whose primary major is in a college other than Business and do not intend to pursue a second Bachelor's in Business are restricted to taking a maximum of 32 hours in Business courses.

In affiliation with various accredited engineering schools, Loyola University Chicago offers a Dual-Degree Program in Physics and Engineering, which enables a student to receive within five years a B.S. degree in Physics from Loyola and a B.S. degree in Engineering from one of the affiliated schools. Students typically attend Loyola for three years of study in the physical sciences and liberal arts, and then complete the program with two more years at the engineering school. For more information see www.luc.edu/depts/physics/currp1.html

Dual Degree Programs

Loyola University offers undergraduate students the opportunity to complete a Baccalaureate degree and a Masters degree within 5 years. These include, but are not limited to: BBA/MSA in Accountancy; BBA/MBA; BBA/MS in Information Systems Management; B.B.A./M.S.I.M.C. Integrated Marketing Communications; B.S. in Biology/MBA; BS/MS in Criminal Justice; BS in Environmental Studies/MBA; BS/MS in Mathematics; BS in Mathematics/MS in Computer Science; BA/MA in Political Science; BS/MA in Applied Social Psychology; BA/MA in Sociology; BSW/MSW.

The Loyola University School of Law, in conjunction with the College of Arts and Sciences, offers a 6 year Baccalaureate/Juris Doctor program that provides an opportunity for a limited number of exceptionally well-qualified Loyola students to enter the School of Law after completing their junior year of undergraduate study and taking the LSAT (the Law School Admission Test). Students participating in this accelerated admission program attain their Bachelor's degree following successful completion of the first year of law school and their law degree (Juris Doctor) after completing all of their law school studies. Careful and early planning is needed to achieve accelerated admission. Students should see the pre-law advisor during their freshman year to plan accordingly.

Enrollment in Courses

While academic advising is available through the First and Second Year Advising Office and in each school and college, each student is responsible for developing an accurate and appropriate schedule of classes each term. Students are allowed to change their registrations in conformity with the guidelines established by the Office of Registration and Records and the Bursar's office. Students are responsible for maintaining the accuracy of their enrollment and understanding the academic and financial consequences of adding or withdrawing courses.

Final Examinations 

Final examinations are given during the scheduled examination period in each session. Students are expected to take their exams as scheduled.  If a student needs to deviate from the exam schedule in any way, the student must contact his or her dean. Students with more than 3 exams on a given day may contact their Dean. Tests or examinations may be given during the semester or summer sessions as often as deemed advisable by the instructor. Students who miss a final examination should contact their instructor.

Grading System

Credit Hour Defined

The credit hour, sometimes called the semester hour, is the standard for computing the amount of a student's scholastic work. A credit hour is normally defined as one lecture, recitation, or other class exercise of 50 minutes per week per semester. Two 50 minute periods of laboratory or studio work are frequently equivalent to one credit hour. Three or four 50-minute periods of clinical or fieldwork in some areas are equivalent to one credit hour. The recommended guideline for additional time spent outside the classroom for one credit hour is 2 to 3 hours per week, allocated among such activities as reading, homework, and test preparation.

Earned credit hours are those that a student receives by successfully passing a course. Attempted credit hours indicate the amount of work the student attempted without reference to grades received. The hours for any course with a final grade other than "W" (withdrawal) or "AU" (audit) are included in attempted credit hours. Attempted credit hours (with the exception of pass no pass courses) are used in computing a student's scholastic average or standing.

Grades and Credit Points

Letter grades and plus/minus indicators (suffixes) are used by instructors to indicate a student's quality of achievement in a given academic course. The letter grades A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, F, WF are assigned the following credit points for purposes of grade point average (GPA) calculations:

Grade Grade Points
A 4.0
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.00
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.00
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.00
F 0
WE (effective Fall 2022) 0
WF (discontinued Fall 2022) 0

A student taking an elective course "pass/no pass" must receive a grade of C- or higher in order to earn a passing grade (P) for the course. Credit hours for which the student earns a grade of "P" will count toward graduation, but there is no grade computed in the grade point average. A student who receives a grade of D+ or lower in a course taken on the Pass-No Pass Option (see below) will receive a non-passing grade of "NP." Credit hours for which the student earns a grade of "NP" will not count toward graduation, and the grade will not be computed in the grade point average.

A grade of "W" indicates official withdrawal from a course through the allowed withdrawal period (see academic calendar for dates). The grade "W" is not counted in computation of academic standing as either attempted or earned credit hours, nor calculated in the grade point average.  With a complete emergency term withdrawal, the grade of “WE” does not count towards attempted credit hours or in GPA (effective Fall 2022).  However, both the “W” and the “WE” count towards attempted hours when determining Satisfactory Academic Progress for continued financial aid eligibility.

A grade of "WF" indicates withdrawal from a class without proper authorization at any time and is also assigned for withdrawal after the approval deadline.  A course with "WF" is counted as attempted credit hours in the computation of academic standing and is calculated as "F" (0 credit points) in the grade point average (discontinued Fall 2022).

A grade of "I" indicates the course is still incomplete. "I" grades are assigned by the student's instructor and must be removed within six weeks of the start of the subsequent term; otherwise the incomplete is converted into a "F" grade.

NR: The notation of "NR" is assigned in instances where the student is registered at Loyola but never attended the course in question and never completed any work for the course.

Quality Points Defined

Quality points are determined by multiplying letter grade credit point value by the credit hours of a course. If a student earns the grade of "A" in a 3-credit hour course, he or she has earned a total of 12 quality points for the course (4 credit points for the "A" multiplied by 3 credit hours for the course). A student who earns a "B+" for a three credit-hour course, therefore, earns a total of 9.99 quality points for the course. Courses in which "F" or "WF" is earned are counted in the total attempted credit hours and receive zero quality hours. Courses with a “WE” are not counted towards attempted credit hours or in the GPA.

Pass No-Pass Option

The primary objective of the pass no-pass option is to encourage students in good standing to explore and experiment in academic areas outside their major or minor field. Students should be aware that the appearance of "P" and "NP" grades on their transcripts may have an adverse effect on changing their major or minor curriculum, transferring to other schools, and acceptance by graduate or professional schools. The following conditions govern this option:

  1. This option is available to a junior (60+ earned credit hours) or senior student in good standing who has satisfied the course prerequisites (or has the written permission of the course instructor). First year students and sophomores may take certain physical education and military science courses under the pass-fail option with permission of their academic dean or the Director of University Advising.
  2. A maximum of twelve credit hours may be taken under the pass fail option during a student's undergraduate career; the credits will be included in the total number of hours earned toward graduation, but will not enter into the computation of cumulative grade point average. A student may take a maximum of two courses under this option in any academic term. Grades of "P" for advanced placement courses that are accepted as transfer credit are not included in the 12-credit-hour total.
  3. Only electives can be taken under the pass no-pass option. Permission will not be given for core, engaged learning, major or minor course requirements.
  4. The grades of "P" and "NP" will appear on the official record of the student's work taken at Loyola University, and may not be converted to any other grade. In the case of a change in a major or minor, the utilization of a course in which the student has already received a grade of "P" toward the requirements of the new major or minor will be at the discretion of the department concerned.
  5. The pass no-pass option may be selected by a student only during the first two weeks of the semester or the first week of a summer session. Once this option is chosen, a return to the regular grading system can only be accomplished during the first two weeks of the semester or the first week of a summer session.
  6. Credit hours earned under this option will not be included in the minimum of 60 graded Loyola hours that must be completed to be eligible for academic honors at graduation.

Auditing Classes

Students wishing to take a course without receiving credit may audit the course. Applicable tuition will be charged. Though a course that is audited does not count as hours attempted, auditors are required to attend class and will be awarded the mark of "AU" upon completion. "AU" does not affect a student's GPA. Failure to attend class will result in the final mark of "W." Assignments, including examinations and term papers, are not required, but auditors have the right to participate in class discussion. Only students who are registered and rostered as auditors will be granted access to Sakai and other course specific media for which registration is required. A course may not be converted to audit status after the first two weeks of the semester or the first week of a summer session.

Graduation

The Degree

Upon successful completion of a student’s course of study the student is awarded a degree. The degrees awarded by Loyola University Chicago include associates, bachelors, masters, or doctoral and indicate that the student has met the rigorous requirements of the program of study in which they were enrolled.

The Diploma and Certificate

Loyola University Chicago presents a hard copy diploma to a student who has earned a degree and a hard copy certificate to a student who has completed a certificate program of study. The diploma and certificate are a public ceremonial symbol of the successful completion of the student’s course of study and an indication that a degree or certificate credential has been awarded. A hard copy diploma is not a degree and a hard copy certificate is not a certificate credential.

Graduation Application Deadlines

Undergraduate Students

Students must file an application for their degree before the assigned dates below. Each degree requires a separate graduation application.

  • Fall graduation: March 1
  • J-Term graduation: March 1
  • Spring graduation: October 1
  • Summer graduation: October 1

Required Hours and Grade Point Average for Graduation

Students must complete 120 hours to graduate. Student must have a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA. They must also have a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA in their Core Curriculum.

Most departments require a minimum 2.00 GPA in their major(s) and minor(s). Students must check with their department(s) for policy on the minimum GPA in their specific major and/or minor.

Required Hours in Residence Needed for Graduation

In-residence hours refers to the course credit hours taken at Loyola University, the Rome Center, or taken from any of the Loyola sponsored study abroad programs through the Office for International Programs.

Students must take their final, uninterrupted 45 hours of instruction or a minimum of 60 hours in residence at Loyola University Chicago.

Graduation Honors

Laudatory Status

A student who earns a cumulative Loyola GPA of at least 3.50 will be graduated cum laude (with honors); of at least 3.70, magna cum laude (with high honors); of at least 3.90, summa cum laude (with highest honors). For the purpose of calculating the grade point average (GPA), averages are NOT rounded, i.e., 3.49 is not rounded to 3.50. Laudatory status requires exactly 3.50 or better. Transfer students must complete a minimum of 60 graded Loyola hours (excluding pass-no pass hours) to be eligible for academic honors. Work completed at a program or college not formally affiliated with Loyola will not be counted. The computation is based on the student's entire academic career at Loyola.

Laudatory status for the degree will be based on certification of all requirements and may differ from the status announced at graduation ceremonies if degree requirements are not certified at the time of the ceremony.

For academic honors conferred by individual schools or departments within schools, consult appropriate sections of this catalog.

Commencement Ceremony

Students who complete their Degree or Certificate Requirements within an Academic Year (Fall, J-Term, Spring or Summer) are invited to attend Loyola's Commencement Ceremony which takes place in May at the end of the Spring Term.

The Commencement Ceremony for Arrupe College students takes place in August.

Diploma & Certificate Information

Diploma and Certificate Name

Because third parties, such as degree verification services, employers, and the international community, etc., often use the name as it appears on the diploma or certificate as the basis for verification of education, it is very important that the name a student uses for their diploma or certificate accurately reflects (ideally be the same as) the student’s Primary Name recorded in the student information system (LOCUS). In keeping with best practices within American higher education, the student’s full Primary Name, as recorded in LOCUS, will be used on the diploma and all other official records printed on behalf of the student. As students prepare for graduation they should carefully check how their name(s) appears in LOCUS. This is a student’s last best opportunity to make certain that their name(s), Primary and Diploma, are spelled correctly and have been correctly recorded in LOCUS.

Significant changes to the student’s Name will be made only in response to a formal written request which includes the submission of a signed Name Change Form accompanied by legal documentation showing the student’s requested Name, e.g., driver’s license, passport, court order, letter of safe passage, marriage license. The Name Change request must be submitted to the Office of Registration and Records.

Where a student wishes a variant of their Primary Name to be printed on the diploma, this name should be entered in the Diploma Name field in LOCUS, subject to the following rules:

  • First names when used in full, must match the students Primary Name.
    • Existing first names may be reduced to an initial.
    • First names may be changed provided a formal name change request is submitted.
  • Middle names, when used in full must match the student’s Primary Name.
    • Existing middle names, may be omitted or reduced to an initial.
    • Middle names or initials may be added provided a formal name change request is submitted.
  • Last names must match the student’s Primary Name.
    • Last names may be changed provided a formal name change request is submitted.
    • Suffixes, such as Sr., Jr., II, III, etc., may be added provided a formal name change request is submitted.
    • Titles and/or degrees, e.g., Esq. M.D., PhD, will not be printed on the graduate’s diploma as part of the Diploma Name. Religious order affiliations can be included, e.g., S.J., OSU.
    • The addition of names or initials, where such were not previously recorded, require verification/documentation, and will constitute a change to the student’s Primary Name.
    • Maternal surnames may be added provided a Name Change Form accompanied by legal documentation is provided.
    • Hyphenated family-married last names may be used provided a Name Change Form accompanied by legal documentation is provided.
    • Special diacritical (accent) marks may be used and should be entered in the Diploma Name field.
    • Punctuations, added or omitted, will be printed on the diploma as entered in the Diploma Name field.

Verification and Ordering Process

  • The Office of Registration and Records is responsible for providing students with their diplomas and certificates, after their respective schools complete degree audits for those students who have applied for graduation.
  • The School certifying the credential(s) may require two to four weeks after final exams have been completed to:
    • Ensure that final grades have been submitted for students.
    • Verify that students have completed all requirements for their credentials.
    • Award the credential and post the degree and/or certificate to LOCUS.
  • Diplomas and certificates are mailed directly to the graduate using the delivery information on file. See DIPLOMA PICK-UP section if students wish to pick up their diploma or certificate. All questions regarding diplomas should be addressed to diploma@luc.edu.
  • If a student has a hold on their LOCUS record, the diploma or certificate will not be released until the hold has been resolved. Once the hold has been resolved, the student is responsible for contacting diploma@luc.edu to confirm ordering information.

Availability of Diplomas and Certificates

Below is an estimated time frame for Diploma and Certificate availability, based on completion term:

  • Fall Undergraduate Students: Early February
  • J-Term Undergraduate Students: Mid February
  • Spring Undergraduate Students: Late June
  • Summer Undergraduate Students: Late September
Diploma and Certificate Mailing

Diplomas and certificates are mailed to the student's Permanent Mailing Address unless a Diploma Mailing Address is recorded in LOCUS. Students are required to verify the accuracy of their address information and to make the necessary correction(s) in LOCUS. Incorrect address information will significantly delay or prevent the delivery of the diploma or certificate.

Diploma and Certificate Pick-Up

Using LOCUS, students wishing to pick up their diplomas or certificates in the Office of Registration and Records should use the Diploma Mailing Address fields and enter:

PKUP-Office of Registration and Records
820 North Michigan Avenue
Ste 510
Chicago, IL 60611

Please notify the Office by sending an email to diploma@luc.edu. The diploma or certificate will only be released to the student. Students will need to present their LUC photo identifications (or other government issued photo identifications) in order to pick up the diploma or certificate.

Diploma and Certificate Mailing Notification

Students are notified by e-mail when their diplomas or certificates are placed in the mail. A second email will be sent to students who requested to pick-up their diploma or certificate when it has arrived to the Office of Registration and Records and is available. If the Office of Registration and Records does not receive the pickup request before the diploma or certificate has been ordered, it will be mailed to the Permanent Address on file.

Return of Mailed Diploma or Certificate

Should a diploma or certificate be returned to the Office of Registration and Records due to an undeliverable address, the graduate will be notified by email to their luc.edu email address, or the email provided on the special order form. Returned diplomas and certificates are held for five years and will be re-mailed at no cost to the graduate, once a corrected mailing address is received. Once destroyed, a replacement fee will be assessed.

Recent graduates and those placing special orders are asked to notify the Office of Registration and Records if delivery has not been received within one calendar year. After one year, a replacement fee will be assessed.

Diploma and Certificate Replacement

Diplomas and certificates damaged in shipment will be replaced at no cost to the recipient. The damaged diploma or certificate must be first returned to the Office of Registration and Records.

Duplicate diplomas and certificates may be ordered by using the Diploma and Certificate Replacement order form. The fee is $50.00 for the first diploma and $25.00 for each additional diploma. The fee is $25.00 for each additional certificate. Duplicate diplomas and certificates will carry, in small lettering, the text, “Duplicate” in the lower right corner of the document.

All questions regarding diploma orders should be addressed to diploma@luc.edu.

For additional information regarding graduation and credential ordering, see the Graduation and Diplomas website.

Leave of Absense

Students may request a one-semester leave of absence. A leave of absence should be requested prior to the start of a fall or spring term, and no later than the final date to withdraw from said term with 100% refund. A student's tuition and fees will be based upon the date of withdrawal. To request a leave of absence, a student must submit the leave of absence form to the appropriate advising dean, or academic advisor, indicating the reason (e.g. illness, family crisis, etc.) for the request. The advising dean of the student's school or college, acting on a case-by-case basis, will have sole authority to grant leave requests. During a leave of absence and at least one month prior to the subsequent semester, the student mus inform the advising dean or academic advisor in writing via Loyola email, of an intention to return. Student who request and receive a leave of absence for one semester will not need to reapply through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions unless they have attended a college or university elsewhere. Students who receive a leave of absence will return to their same academic program under the catalog year requirements that were in place as they tool the leave of absence, provided they did not attend another college or university while on leave. Student who do not return after the one term leave of absence ends will be administratively withdrawn from the university. Withdrawn students will need to apply for readmission and will be held to the degree requirements of the catalog year in which they are readmitted. Students should reach out to the financial aid office (lufinaid@luc.edu) with questions regarding how a student's financial aid package will be affected by a leave of absence.

Military Service

Students who have been called into the armed services of the United States and who are consequently withdrawing from the university before the end of the withdrawal period will receive a refund of all tuition and fees paid for the period in question but no academic credit. If they withdraw after the end of the withdrawal period, they will receive full academic credit for the semester with grades as of the date of withdrawal but no refund of tuition.

Permission to Take Coursework at Other Universities 

Policy on Prior Permission to Take Coursework at Other Universities

Undergraduate students are limited to a total of 12 hours of study at other regionally accredited U.S. colleges and universities after they matriculate to Loyola. This includes those who matriculate as freshmen or as transfer students. Transfer students who transferred in with 60 or more hours may not take additional courses elsewhere.

Prior permission is mandatory.  Students must obtain permission to take a course at another U.S. institution prior to enrolling in it.  Prior permission will be granted by advisors or the dean, chairperson, or program director as outlined below.

In addition, credit earned via Loyola-approved study abroad programs are not included in this 12 hour limit, and are subject to a different approval process.  For more information on how study abroad credit is approved, visit the Study Abroad web site.

Summer Study

Students who wish to take courses during the summer session are encouraged to take courses offered through Loyola's Summer Sessions. Prior permission may be granted to take a course at another U.S. institution only if a comparable course is not offered during Loyola's Summer Sessions. Financial reasons alone (e.g., a course is less expensive than at Loyola) are not sufficient for approval.

An academic advisor may approve courses to fulfill elective credits. A dean, chairperson or program director may approve courses to fulfill major/minor requirements or electives within major/minor requirements.

Students who wish to study abroad, i.e., take courses for credit at any institution outside the 50 United States (even if the courses or study abroad program is offered via a U.S. accredited institution) must apply through the Office for International programs (OIP) and receive OIP permission before enrolling in courses or departing from the U.S.

Core Curriculum Credits

Because of the nature of Loyola's outcomes-based university Core Curriculum and the pedagogical integration of learning on knowledge, skills and values, all Core classes must be taken at Loyola. Special circumstances for granting exceptions to this policy will be the responsibility of the faculty director of the Core Curriculum.

Completing a Request for Approval

For courses at U.S. institutions, the student and academic advisor (or the dean, chairperson, or program director) must complete the following form: Appeal For Permission to Take Courses Elsewhere. The student should meet with an academic advisor to discuss requests for permission to take courses at another U.S. institution in the summer. The form must be submitted in time to secure permission prior to enrolling in a course at another institution.

Students who wish to study abroad, i.e. take courses for credit at any institution outside the 50 United States (even if the courses or study abroad program is offered via a U.S. accredited institution) must apply through the Office of International Programs (OIP) and receive OIP permission before enrolling in courses or department from the U.S.  This process and the associated deadlines are outlined on the Study Abroad web site.

Readmission Requirements and Procedures

Students in good academic and disciplinary standing who have been absent from Loyola University Chicago for not more than one semester may be readmitted with no change in degree requirements, provided they have not attended another college or university during their absence from Loyola. Such applicants for readmission should contact the office of their former dean for counseling and directions for registration. However, if a student wishes to enter another division of the university, the application for readmission must be filed, and the student will be held to the degree and curriculum requirements in force at the time of entrance to the division.

Applicants for readmission who have attended other schools during their absence from Loyola must submit official transcripts of their work from each institution to the Undergraduate Admission Office before their applications can be considered. The application for readmission will be judged according to the admission regulations of each college.

Applicants for readmission to full-time divisions who have been dropped from Loyola for poor scholarship may apply for readmission after one year of absence.

Applicants for readmission who have been dropped from Loyola for disciplinary reasons must have their applications for readmission reviewed by the dean of students. If the dean approves readmission, the application will be reviewed according to the regulations stated above. Notification of readmission is usually mailed about four to five weeks after the admission office receives all necessary transcripts. Applications for readmission are available in the Undergraduate Admission Office at both lakeside campuses as well as at all dean's offices.

Registration

No one is permitted to attend any class without first officially registering for that class. Students may not register for classes after the late registration period. A fee is charged for late registration.

Registration at Loyola University Chicago is done through the LOCUS online registration system. For specific information on registration, please refer to www.luc.edu/regrec.

Repetition of Courses

Students may repeat a course in which they previously received a passing grade only with the specific authorization of their academic dean. Such repetition may be required if students received a "D+" or lower grade in a course in the major or minor field (e.g., biology courses only for biology majors), or if specific departmental regulations so require.

Authorization to repeat courses merely to improve the grade will rarely be given. The grade in a repeated course does not replace the original grade earned. The grades in both courses are averaged together. For example, if a student received a "D+" in a 3-hour course and a "B-" in the repeat, the quality points are added together (12.00) and divided by the total hours of both courses (6.00). This provides the course grade point (2.00).

In an authorized repetition of a course the student will not receive credit hours toward graduation for both courses. The student will only receive credit hours toward graduation for equivalent to one of the courses (3 hours) since credit hours in the course have already been earned. The repeated course, however, is counted for attempted hours and quality points for the accurate computation of grade point average for the term in which it is taken.

A student who repeats a course without permission of the dean earns neither credit hours nor quality points for the repeated course.

Students with Disabilities

At times, students with disabilities may wish to avail themselves of the University's ancillary services. Students who would like accommodations at the University need to contact the Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities. Contact information is available at www.luc.edu/sswd.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

Confidentiality of Educational Records

Loyola University Chicago complies with the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 ("FERPA") when releasing personally identifiable information concerning students. FERPA stipulates that a student's education record is confidential information and must not be released without prior written consent of the student. FERPA does permit the release of "Directory Information." Directory information is information which would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. Students have the right to withhold "directory Information." However, the student should consider the consequences of such a request as Loyola University Chicago will honor the request, until removed in writing by the student. Loyola University Chicago has determined directory information to consist of a student's:

  • Name
  • Address(es) and telephone number
  • University e-mail address
  • Photograph
  • Major and minor field(s) of study, including the college, division, department, institute or program in which the student is enrolled
  • Dates of attendance
  • Grade level (Such as freshman, sophomore, junior, senior or graduate level)
  • Enrollment status (Undergraduate or graduate, full-time or part-time)
  • Date of graduation
  • Degree(s) received
  • Honors or awards received, including selection to a Dean's list or honorary organization
  • Participation in officially recognized activities or sports
  • Weight and height of members of athletic teams

Transcripts of College Records

All official transcripts of Loyola University academic records are issued by the Office of Registration and Records. For specific instructions to obtain a transcript, please refer to www.luc.edu/regrec.

Transfer Credit Policy

Loyola awards transfer credit for college-level, academic courses completed at other accredited two-year and four-year post-secondary institutions in good standing with their academic accrediting association. Generally, those institutions will be accredited by one of seven accrediting associations:

  • Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC)
  • New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE)
  • Higher Learning Commission (HLC)
  • Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE)
  • Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU)
  • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)
  • WASC Senior College and University Commission

Loyola University Chicago is a participant in the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI), a state-wide agreement that allows transfer students to complete the IAI General Education Core Curriculum (GECC) in lieu of a receiving institution’s core curriculum.

Credit is awarded in semester hours. Courses completed in quarter hours will be converted into semester hours.

Credit Guidelines

  • A maximum of 64 semester credits are accepted from two-year colleges. There is no maximum number of credits from four-year institutions.
  • Once enrolled as a degree-seeking student at Loyola, students must request permission to take courses and earn college credit elsewhere. Transfer credit will not be accepted for courses taken elsewhere while the student is simultaneously enrolled at Loyola.
  • Dual credit earned through Loyola’s Dual Credit Program will be included on the Loyola transcript and calculated in the Loyola GPA.  You may not replace the course and grade with credit by examination.
  • Credit not eligible for transfer towards an undergraduate degree includes:
    • Trade school, job training, or adult/continuing education courses
    • Developmental courses (below 100-level)
    • English as a Second Language (ESL) course credit
    • Courses from institutions that are not accredited
    • Graduate level courses

Transfer Credit Policy for New (First-Time) Freshmen1

"New First-Time Freshmen" refers to students who have never completed any college credit after high school graduation. Students who complete college coursework while still in high school (known as Dual Enrollment Credit) qualify as new first-time freshman.

New first-time freshman may transfer a maximum of 36 semester hours of credit from AP/IB/CLEP and/or transfer credit toward their undergraduate degree requirements under the following conditions:

  1. The college course must have been conducted in conjunction with an institution of higher education accredited by one of the seven accrediting associations listed above. Students are required to produce an official transcript from the partner higher education institution. High School transcripts will not be accepted for transfer credit.
  2. The student must have earned a grade of B or higher in such transfer courses. Grades of B- or below, P, S, or CR will not be granted credit.
  3. Students awarded such transfer credit are limited to a maximum of 36 semester hours for the combined total of AP creditIB creditCLEP and/or transfer credit.
  4. The transfer credits will be applied toward the normal 120 credit hour graduation requirement and be consistent with transfer articulation rules in effect for Core, Major, School, or Elective credit.
  5. An exception may be granted to students who attended a high school in which students may earn an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree while in high school; students who earn an AA or AS degree while in high school may be granted up to 64 semester hours of eligible credit.2 (An Associate of Applied Science or other terminal associate's degree does not qualify for this exception.)
  6. Completion of an AA or AS degree does not exempt new first-time freshman from Loyola's Core Curriculum. Credits with a grade of B or higher will be evaluated course by course and applied to individual Core requirements if applicable. Students will need to take additional Core classes to complete their Core requirements.
  7. This policy will be administered by the Office of Registration and Records.
  8. For questions concerning core requirements, please contact your Academic Advisor.
  9. AP/IB/CLEP information can be found at: https://www.luc.edu/undergrad/academics/creditbyexam/
  10. Course equivalency information can be checked using the MyList tool in LOCUS or Transferology.
1

This policy applies to students admitted during the Fall of 2013 or later.

2

Credit not eligible for transfer includes:

  • Trade school, job training, or adult/continuing education courses
  • Developmental courses (below 100-level)
  • English as a Second Language (ESL) course credit
  • Courses from institutions that are not regionally accredited

University Core Curriculum

Every Loyola Undergraduate, regardless of college or school, will complete the University Core Curriculum.

The Core Curriculum consists of 16 courses (48 credit hours) distributed over 10 Core Knowledge Areas. Students will complete coursework in:

Required Core Areas Required Courses Credit Hours
Artistic Knowledge and Inquiry 1 3
College Writing Seminar 1 3
Ethical Knowledge and Inquiry 1 3
Historical Knowledge and Inquiry 2 6
Literary Knowledge and Inquiry 2 6
Philosophical Knowledge and Inquiry 2 6
Quantitative Knowledge and Inquiry 1 3
Scientific Knowledge and Inquiry 2 6
Societal and Cultural Knowledge and Inquiry 2 6
Theological & Religious Knowledge and Inquiry 2 6
Total 16 courses 48 hours

Each course that has been approved for the University Core Curriculum will reinforce one or more of the following six Skills: communication, critical thinking, ethical awareness and decision making, quantitative and qualitative analysis and research methods, and technological literacy.

These courses also integrate the understanding and promoting of four Values essential to a Loyola education: understanding diversity in the US or the world; understanding and promoting justice; understanding spirituality or faith in action in the world; and promoting engaged learning.

Students' majors and minor may fulfill one or more areas of the Core Knowledge component. See here for specifics.

For more information on the University Core Curriculum and to see the list of approved core courses by Core Knowledge Area go here.

University Core Curriculum Grade Requirements

Students must earn grades of at least D in approved Core courses to have that course count for Core credit, with the exception of the College Writing Seminar, which requires a minimum of C- for credit. Students must have an overall grade point average of 2.00 in all courses they apply to the Core Curriculum.

Required Hours and Grade Point Average for Graduation

Students must complete 120 hours to graduate. Student must have a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA. They must also have a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA in their Core Curriculum.

Most departments require a minimum 2.00 GPA in their major(s) and minor(s). Students must check with their department(s) for policy on the minimum GPA in the major and/or minor.

Withdrawal From a Class

After the last day to drop without a “W”, students may withdraw from a class or classes with the grade of “W” based on calendar dates noted for each term on the official university academic calendar.

Most students do not need permission to withdraw from a class or classes during any term. Students that are blocked from dropping a class or classes during an academic term should meet with their academic advisor, program director, or associate/assistant dean.

Students who stop attending a class but have not officially withdrawn will not earn a grade of “W”. A student in this situation will earn a grade based on coursework completed minus any work, including a final exam, that is not completed. This includes students that make the decision to stop attending after the final date to earn a “W”.

The bursar maintains the withdrawal schedule for any tuition credit for a class or classes that a student withdraws from during any term. This schedule is posted on the Bursar website.

Students contemplating withdrawal from a class and receiving or expecting to receive financial assistance should consult with the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

Withdrawal From the University

An enrolled student who wishes to completely withdraw from the university during any term must notify their academic advisor, academic program director, or assistant/associate dean of their college/school of their intent. The notification may be in person or in writing using their Loyola University Chicago email address. A student is considered to be in attendance until such notice has been received by the academic advisor and appropriate steps have been taken to completely withdraw a student from a term. The last date of class activity is the date utilized for both the “W” or “WE” grade and the Office of the Bursar’s withdrawal refund calendar.

A student may be required to withdraw from the university because of academic deficiency, lack of sufficient progress toward completion of degree requirements, failure to adhere to university requirements and/ or degree requirements, failure to adhere to university requirements and regulations for conduct, or failure to meet financial obligations to the university.

Complete Emergency Withdrawal

Students facing a significant emergency circumstance (see “Definitions” section below) that prevents them from continuing in or completing an academic term may submit an Intent to Withdraw form to their primary academic advisor, program director or assistant/associate dean. All requests must be supported by appropriate documentation. The Intent to Withdraw form is reviewed by the academic dean’s office of the student’s primary college/school for approval and processing.

Requests for complete emergency term withdrawals are considered after the last day of a term to drop a course or courses without a grade of “W.” In cases where the student is incapacitated (see “Emergencies Resulting in Student Incapacitation” below for more details), the requests for complete emergency term withdrawals may be submitted by a parent, spouse or legal guardian.

Complete emergency term withdrawals constitute a withdrawal from all classes and may result in final grades of “WE” in all classes for the given academic term. The University does not grant partial withdrawals (i.e., requests to withdraw from some classes but not others) for emergencies. Grades of “WE” have no impact on a student’s cumulative GPA. The “WE” grade has no earned or attempted hours associated with the grade; however, “WE” counts towards attempted hours when determining Satisfactory Academic Progress for continued financial aid eligibility. This policy does not apply in cases where the student has completed final exams or final projects for classes in the term impacted by the significant emergency circumstance. When final grades have posted, students should utilize the Appeal for Change of Academic Record form and submit to their primary academic advisor, program director or assistant/associate Dean.

The Office of the Bursar will determine the impact of the Withdrawal on the students account balance in LOCUS. The Student Account Balance will be determined by the University withdrawal calendar Loyola Withdrawal Schedule. The Bursar will not assess any late payment fees after the date of Withdrawal.

Emergencies Resulting in Student Incapacitation

It is required that a complete emergency term withdrawal request be submitted by the student. However, if an emergency situation has resulted in the student’s temporary or long-term incapacitation for a period that may extend beyond the one-calendar-year deadline of this policy, the student’s college/school academic dean’s office, the Office of the Dean of Students, a parent (for minors), emergency contact person, or other legally assigned designee may submit a request on the student’s behalf. In such cases, the student’s college/school academic dean’s office may require additional documentation (e.g., letter from medical doctor, hospitalization forms, power of attorney).

Potential Implications

The section below provides a non-exhaustive list and general information on the potential implications of a complete emergency term withdrawal. While the University offers a number of considerations that help support students who are facing emergencies, there are other important factors that should be taken into consideration before submitting a request for a complete emergency term withdrawal. Whenever possible, it is strongly recommended that a student discuss all possible options, including the potential implications of a complete emergency withdrawal with their primary academic advisor.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: TUITION AND FINANCIAL AID

Students are strongly encouraged to purchase tuition insurance (e.g., A.W.G Dewar, Inc.) prior to the start of the academic term.

Note that a complete emergency withdrawal does not automatically result in tuition credit. Please refer to the withdrawal schedule on the Office of the Bursar’s website.

Complete Emergency Withdrawal Procedures During an Academic Term

  1. Initial Step- Submit intent to Withdraw form to primary academic advisor

Although it is recommended that the student submit as much information as possible, documentation does not need to specify details of the emergency that may be protected by law or considered private. Documentation must come from a verifiable authority (e.g., community/licensed healthcare provider, police agency, court of law, US military etc.) and minimally confirm the following:

  • general description
  • date (or time span)
  • time, and
  • location (if appropriate) of significant emergency circumstance
  • Review and Decision

Requests for a complete emergency withdrawal will be reviewed and decided by the student’s college/school academic dean’s office. Other areas, such as the Office of the Dean of Students, the Office for Equity & Compliance, or Student Accessibility Center, may be consulted in cases where the student was either referred or is being supported by said office. Additional documentation and/or information may be requested of the student before a final decision is made.

The student will receive a written decision notification no later than 14 business days after receipt of original request via LUC email. If the school is unable to meet the 14 business-days deadline, the student will be notified in writing of the new deadline. If the request is approved, the effective date and further instructions before returning to campus (if necessary) will be provided. The date of the complete emergency withdrawal will be determined by the primary college/school dean’s office based on the date of the last academically related activity.

Post-Emergency Complete Withdrawal Re-Entry Process

Unless otherwise indicated in the approval notification or by the Office of the Dean of Students in lieu of the Loyola University Chicago Behavior Concerns Team (BCT), the process for returning to the university will follow standard policies and procedures for re-enrollment. Students who were being supported by BCT before withdrawing or are returning because of a mental health hospitalization are required to consult the Office of the Dean of Students for instructions on potential re-entry requirements.

Definitions

Significant Emergency Circumstance – an unforeseen emergency situation that prevents a student from continuing in or completing an academic term. Some examples include but are not limited to:

  • Chronic illness of withdrawing student
  • Death of parent/legal guardian or medical issue of a family member and the withdrawing student must become a part-time or full-time caretaker of family member
  • Extreme financial hardship
  • Mental health condition, serious injury or illness of withdrawing student
  • Sudden or consistent lack of transportation which affected the withdrawing student’s ability to meet in-person attendance requirements
  • Other situations, at the University’s sole discretion, which are deemed to result in significant hardship to the withdrawing student

This list includes examples of emergency situations that directly affect the student.